Fatma Loves to Draw!

A drawer in the virtual world, a graphic designer in "real life." In other words, being in the wrong place at the wrong time all the time.
lostateminor:

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This is a rare photo of Mt. Fuji’s shadow

Due to low hanging clouds and fog, the view atop Mt. Fuji is usually blocked, hindering climbers from experiencing the majestic sights surrounding the iconic mountain. But sometime in 2012, during his 4th attempt, photographer ‘Kris J B’ captured this rare shot of Mt. Fuji’s near-perfect triangle shadow draped over the landscape below.
With a stunning photo like it, ‘Kris J B’ shared it online and it immediately went viral. To his dismay, the photo was widely circulated on content-sharing sites without even a hat-tip to him. Even worse, it even became part of those ‘free desktop background’ offerings. He shares the full story on PetaPixel.
You can find out more about ‘Kris J B’ and his work on his website and Facebook page.
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lostateminor:

>

This is a rare photo of Mt. Fuji’s shadow

image

Due to low hanging clouds and fog, the view atop Mt. Fuji is usually blocked, hindering climbers from experiencing the majestic sights surrounding the iconic mountain. But sometime in 2012, during his 4th attempt, photographer ‘Kris J B’ captured this rare shot of Mt. Fuji’s near-perfect triangle shadow draped over the landscape below.

With a stunning photo like it, ‘Kris J B’ shared it online and it immediately went viral. To his dismay, the photo was widely circulated on content-sharing sites without even a hat-tip to him. Even worse, it even became part of those ‘free desktop background’ offerings. He shares the full story on PetaPixel.

You can find out more about ‘Kris J B’ and his work on his website and Facebook page.

museumnerd:

When Attitudes Become Form [Bern 1969/Venice 2013] (Post 1)
Joseph Beuys “Fettecke" [Fat Corner] 1969, made by smearing margarine into the room’s corner while listening to his own 1968 recording "Ja Ja Ja Ja Ja Nee Nee Nee Nee Nee." "Fettecke" and the recording are both in When Attitudes Become Form, a recreation of Harald Szeeman’s landmark 1969 Bern Kunsthalle exhibit (now up at Fondazione Prada’s Venice space Ca’ Corner della Regina).
The show is a fantastic experiment in time travel. Even the Bern Kunsthalle’s interior architecture is recreated within the Prada palazzo right down to the radiators (pic of that to come in another post). It’s a surreal, mind-warping experience.
I’ll do a couple more photo posts as soon as I get the chance (spotty internet in my hotel). Everything in the show is so multilayered with meanings—both the meanings they had in 1969 and in Bern and meanings now in Venice in 2013!
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museumnerd:

When Attitudes Become Form [Bern 1969/Venice 2013] (Post 1)
Joseph Beuys “Fettecke" [Fat Corner] 1969, made by smearing margarine into the room’s corner while listening to his own 1968 recording "Ja Ja Ja Ja Ja Nee Nee Nee Nee Nee." "Fettecke" and the recording are both in When Attitudes Become Form, a recreation of Harald Szeeman’s landmark 1969 Bern Kunsthalle exhibit (now up at Fondazione Prada’s Venice space Ca’ Corner della Regina).
The show is a fantastic experiment in time travel. Even the Bern Kunsthalle’s interior architecture is recreated within the Prada palazzo right down to the radiators (pic of that to come in another post). It’s a surreal, mind-warping experience.
I’ll do a couple more photo posts as soon as I get the chance (spotty internet in my hotel). Everything in the show is so multilayered with meanings—both the meanings they had in 1969 and in Bern and meanings now in Venice in 2013!
Zoom
Info
museumnerd:

When Attitudes Become Form [Bern 1969/Venice 2013] (Post 1)
Joseph Beuys “Fettecke" [Fat Corner] 1969, made by smearing margarine into the room’s corner while listening to his own 1968 recording "Ja Ja Ja Ja Ja Nee Nee Nee Nee Nee." "Fettecke" and the recording are both in When Attitudes Become Form, a recreation of Harald Szeeman’s landmark 1969 Bern Kunsthalle exhibit (now up at Fondazione Prada’s Venice space Ca’ Corner della Regina).
The show is a fantastic experiment in time travel. Even the Bern Kunsthalle’s interior architecture is recreated within the Prada palazzo right down to the radiators (pic of that to come in another post). It’s a surreal, mind-warping experience.
I’ll do a couple more photo posts as soon as I get the chance (spotty internet in my hotel). Everything in the show is so multilayered with meanings—both the meanings they had in 1969 and in Bern and meanings now in Venice in 2013!
Zoom
Info

museumnerd:

When Attitudes Become Form [Bern 1969/Venice 2013] (Post 1)

Joseph BeuysFettecke" [Fat Corner] 1969, made by smearing margarine into the room’s corner while listening to his own 1968 recording "Ja Ja Ja Ja Ja Nee Nee Nee Nee Nee." "Fettecke" and the recording are both in When Attitudes Become Form, a recreation of Harald Szeeman’s landmark 1969 Bern Kunsthalle exhibit (now up at Fondazione Prada’s Venice space Ca’ Corner della Regina).

The show is a fantastic experiment in time travel. Even the Bern Kunsthalle’s interior architecture is recreated within the Prada palazzo right down to the radiators (pic of that to come in another post). It’s a surreal, mind-warping experience.

I’ll do a couple more photo posts as soon as I get the chance (spotty internet in my hotel). Everything in the show is so multilayered with meanings—both the meanings they had in 1969 and in Bern and meanings now in Venice in 2013!

nycartscene:

Recently Opened:“Props For Memory” Joseph Beuys, Paul P., Amanda Ross-HoINVISIBLE-EXPORTS, 14A Orchard St., NYC (bt Hester and Canal)The work of the three artists presented here addresses the problem of time raised by the failures of memory—the false promise of total recall and the failure of even the most savantish memory, or the deepest archive, to truly preserve. The two living artists, Paris-based painter Paul P. and Los Angeles multimedia artist Amanda Ross-Ho, each present portraits of moments otherwise destined to be forgotten, portraits that encode a kind of ambivalence about the project of remembering or preserving itself—snapshots of moments clouded by indeterminancy, vagueness, fantasy, and flux. Beuys, whose Economic Value work is included as a kind of forebear, addresses the problem in a more innocent way—by assembling a Potemkin grocery store, filled with bygone products he remembered keenly from his own postwar childhood, as a kind of record, of his own inner life as a pre-teen commodity fetishist, understandable only to him and, therefore, doomed to decay. - thru Oct 21
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nycartscene:

Recently Opened:

Props For Memory
 Joseph Beuys, Paul P., Amanda Ross-Ho

INVISIBLE-EXPORTS, 14A Orchard St., NYC (bt Hester and Canal)

The work of the three artists presented here addresses the problem of time raised by the failures of memory—the false promise of total recall and the failure of even the most savantish memory, or the deepest archive, to truly preserve. The two living artists, Paris-based painter Paul P. and Los Angeles multimedia artist Amanda Ross-Ho, each present portraits of moments otherwise destined to be forgotten, portraits that encode a kind of ambivalence about the project of remembering or preserving itself—snapshots of moments clouded by indeterminancy, vagueness, fantasy, and flux. Beuys, whose Economic Value work is included as a kind of forebear, addresses the problem in a more innocent way—by assembling a Potemkin grocery store, filled with bygone products he remembered keenly from his own postwar childhood, as a kind of record, of his own inner life as a pre-teen commodity fetishist, understandable only to him and, therefore, doomed to decay. - thru Oct 21

fungus:

how to explain pictures to a dead hare, joseph beuys (1965).

at the beginning of the performance, Beuys locked the gallery doors from the inside, leaving the gallery-goers outside. they could observe the scene within only through the windows. with his head entirely coated in honey and gold leaf, he began to explain the pictures in the gallery to a dead hare. whispering to the dead animal on his arm in an apparent dialog, he processed through the exhibit from artwork to artwork. occasionally he would stop and return to the center of the gallery, where he stepped over a dead fir tree that lay on the floor. after three hours the public was let into the room. Beuys sat upon a stool in the entrance area with the hare on his arm and his back to the onlookers.
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fungus:

how to explain pictures to a dead hare, joseph beuys (1965).

at the beginning of the performance, Beuys locked the gallery doors from the inside, leaving the gallery-goers outside. they could observe the scene within only through the windows. with his head entirely coated in honey and gold leaf, he began to explain the pictures in the gallery to a dead hare. whispering to the dead animal on his arm in an apparent dialog, he processed through the exhibit from artwork to artwork. occasionally he would stop and return to the center of the gallery, where he stepped over a dead fir tree that lay on the floor. after three hours the public was let into the room. Beuys sat upon a stool in the entrance area with the hare on his arm and his back to the onlookers.

homofloresiensis:

I like America and America likes me, Joseph Beuys 1974

"I wanted to isolate myself, insulate myself, see nothing of America other than the coyote."

Beuys was a German avante-garde performance and avant garde artist, whose work forced viewers to question museums and view them naked and stripped. His work transformed museums from untouchable monuments to spaces of cultural experience - while also parodying and making political statements.
In I like America and America likes me, Beuys spent 5 days in a room without food or water living with an untamed coyote. The only other items in the room were a wool blanket, in which he swathed himself, and shredded articles from the Wall Street Journal. Beuys’ hope was that the coyote would use the WSJ shreds as a nest, but never explained his intended metaphor. One can only guess.
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homofloresiensis:

I like America and America likes me, Joseph Beuys 1974

"I wanted to isolate myself, insulate myself, see nothing of America other than the coyote."

Beuys was a German avante-garde performance and avant garde artist, whose work forced viewers to question museums and view them naked and stripped. His work transformed museums from untouchable monuments to spaces of cultural experience - while also parodying and making political statements.
In I like America and America likes me, Beuys spent 5 days in a room without food or water living with an untamed coyote. The only other items in the room were a wool blanket, in which he swathed himself, and shredded articles from the Wall Street Journal. Beuys’ hope was that the coyote would use the WSJ shreds as a nest, but never explained his intended metaphor. One can only guess.
Zoom
Info

homofloresiensis:

I like America and America likes me, Joseph Beuys 1974

"I wanted to isolate myself, insulate myself, see nothing of America other than the coyote."

Beuys was a German avante-garde performance and avant garde artist, whose work forced viewers to question museums and view them naked and stripped. His work transformed museums from untouchable monuments to spaces of cultural experience - while also parodying and making political statements.

In I like America and America likes me, Beuys spent 5 days in a room without food or water living with an untamed coyote. The only other items in the room were a wool blanket, in which he swathed himself, and shredded articles from the Wall Street Journal. Beuys’ hope was that the coyote would use the WSJ shreds as a nest, but never explained his intended metaphor. One can only guess.

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